Posts Tagged ‘All New All Different’

image

Bad news: Becca Rodriguez’s plane just crashed.  Good news: She survived.  Bad news: She somehow ended up in Weirdworld.  There is actually a fair amount of spoiler type information contained in this issue, so I’m going to do my best to try and avoid it.  For those wondering how Weirdworld still fits into the landscape of the All-New All-Different Marvel Universe, that gets explained.  For those wondering what happened to the Weirdworld from the Secret Wars tie-in mini-series, that is also explained.

Sam Humphries picks up the Weirdworld reins not far from where Jason Aaron left them.  His story is a bit quicker-paced than Aaron’s, but it doesn’t seem to cut quite as deep, not right away at least.  There is an indication that we might get some deeper character moments in upcoming issues.

When it came to the art for this series, Marvel employed the “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” approach and re-upped Mike del Mundo for the job.  In my opinion, it was a smart move.  Del Mundo’s unique style really gives the world a signature look and feel.  On top of that, his creature design is fantastic.

If you like action, this one jumps right into it from the start.  There is some emotion mixed in toward the end of the issue, which definitely adds some gravity and seriousness to an otherwise lighthearted beginning to the story.  I look forward to what Humphries has in store for Becca and her new friends.

The Verdict for Weirdworld (Vol 2) #1:
5 out of 5

If you like this review, or any of my others, don’t forget to subscribe!

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

Advertisements

image

Daredevil got his first new series in the All-New, All-Different Marvel universe last week, and he brought a new friend.  Matt Murdock returns as the blind lawyer from Hell’s Kitchen, only this time, rather than being a defense attorney, he’s actually working for the city as an ADA.  He’s working with an informant to bring down a dangerous cult known as the Church of Ten Fingers.  Matt works with the informant by day, while Daredevil protects him at night, all while training a new recruit in the fight against crime, a young man from Hell’s Kitchen with the hero name Blindspot.

Charles Soule writes a very character driven story here, which is something that he’s pretty good at.  There’s a lot of introspection and inner monologue from Matt, and it really helps to build and solidify the character.  Realistically, Daredevil doesn’t have super powers, he’s just a regular guy with an interesting ability, and that shows here.  He gets hit, and it hurts, he gets cut, and he bleeds, just like everyone else.  He’s easily one of the most human heroes out there, and Soule seems to understand that and writes the story accordingly.  I would have liked to see a little more of Blindspot, just to get to know him a little better, but I’m sure that will come in the next few issues.  He also gives us a pretty creepy villain to boot.

Ron Garney gets the artwork here, and for as gritty and unclean as it is, it’s really something wonderful to look at.  This world is dark, and sometimes blurry, and it’s probably a lot like the way Matt views the world.  The look of this comic is amazing.  The contrast and shading for when Daredevil uses his radar sense is really fantastic, and again, it all goes toward the effect of seeing the world through your main character’s eyes.  When you can get your audience to do that, it makes relating to the main character that much easier.

This is definitely one of the best new comics I’ve read this year.  Soule seems to get the character and writes him exceedingly well, while Garney gives us a world that is dark and beautiful in its scope.  I would highly recommend this book if you still haven’t figured out what to read in the new Marvel books just yet.  I hadn’t read a whole lot of Daredevil stories to this point, but this seems like a great place to start.

The Verdict for Daredevil #1:
5 out of 5

If you like this review, or any of my others, don’t forget to subscribe!

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

image

Dennis Hopeless and Mark Bagley take another version of the world’s most famous mutant’s in All-New X-Men #1.  This is the same original group of X-Men that Hank McCoy pulled from the past in the recent volume of All-New X-Men, minus the young Jean Grey, who is flying under the radar and possibly working with the Extraordinary X-Men.  In this series, the X-Men are trying to find the young Scott Summers, who has been quietly tracking a group of mutant criminals on his own.

Hopeless writes a solid story here, not breaking it up too much between multiple different characters in different locations.  He keeps the narrative nice and tight to prevent confusion, while building some character depth in the process.  Some additions to the roster, like the new Wolverine, haven’t really been fleshed out and explained all that well just yet, but it’s still early.  Hopeless also makes the character of Scott Summers more interesting and sympathetic than he has been in quite a while.  It’s a refreshing change of pace for a character who had become exceedingly darker over the years.

Bagley’s artwork is good, not great, but good.  I’ve essentially been a fan of his since the early days of his work on Ultimate Spider-Man, so I’ve grown accustomed to his style over the years.  However, I will say what I’ve said before when it comes to his art, I feel like he’d better served with a smaller cast of characters, as all the faces start to look the same after a while.  That being said, he does an admirable job on this first issue, and I hope the rest continue to look this good.

Overall this book is solid, and I definitely like it a lot more than Extraordinary X-Men.  In the end, I’ll probably end up sticking with this one, while I’ve already contemplated dropping Extraordinary.  There’s a little bit more backstory required for All-New X-Men, but if you take the few minutes to acquaint yourself with it, I think it will end up being the better X-book.

The Verdict for All-New X-Men #1:
5 out of 5

If you like this review, or any of my others, don’t forget to subscribe!

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

image

Lunella Lafayette is an incredibly intelligent misfit teenager who also happens to possess Inhuman genes.  The scope of her power is unclear, but when she unwittingly summons a dinosaur into the present time, it’s hard to say exactly what will happen.  Writers Amy Reeder and Brandon Montclare spend a significant amount of time in this issue setting up Lunella as an outcast.  She’s smarter than her fellow students, and most of her teachers, so she doesn’t really fit in.  They then tell the story of Devil Dinosaur, which is not so different from Lunella in that he is hated and feared by other species because of his size and power.  Clearly these two will team-up, but the real entertainment will be in their relationship going forward.  Natacha Bustos provides the artwork in this issue and it has a fun, youth centric vibe too it.  I wouldn’t go so far as to say this book is aimed at younger readers, but it’s definitely shaping up to be a fun and probably pretty cute buddy story, and really, who doesn’t like dinosaurs?

The Verdict for Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur #1:
4 out of 5

If you like this review, or any of my others, don’t forget to subscribe!

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.