Posts Tagged ‘Hail Hydra’

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Hail Hydra has been Rick Remender’s vision of a world (or in this case a Battleworld domain) run by the Hydra villains of the Marvel universe.  In the last issue, we witnessed what might have been the destruction of the last hope for the good guys, but Ian continues on undeterred, just like his father taught him.  Remender builds on that theme of hopelessness here, while simultaneously devising a way for Nomad to get past Baron Zola’s security.  One of the things that I didn’t like was how the side character, Ellie, came off as incredibly whiny.  Unfortunately, it happens more than once in this issue, and I feel like it’s at a detriment to the story and probably not the way she would act given who her parents are.  Boschi’s art continues to fit well with the dark nature of the story, but some of the finer details about it just aren’t there.

The Verdict for Hail Hydra #3:
3 out of 5

If you like this review, or any of my others, don’t forget to subscribe!

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

Upcoming reviews:
Captain America: White #2
Secret Wars #6
Old Man Logan #5 (Secret Wars Tie-In)
Doctor Strange #1 (All New, All Different Marvel)
RunLoveKill, Volume 1
Crimson Peak (Movie)

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Rick Remender’s continuation of his Captain America run continues on Battleworld in Hail Hydra #2.  Nomad, aka Ian Rogers is in an unique situation as he fights an alternate reality version of himself that was raised by Arnim Zola and not Steve Rogers.  During the course of the fight he is seriously injured, but manages to find his way to a group of the leftover heroes hiding out in the sewers.  Zola tries to find Ian again by using his best tracker, Venom.

Remender’s storytelling in this issue is fast and furious.  He leaves little time to soak in the implications of the major events as they happen, and there are plenty here.  He also pulls no punches, which I guess is one of the artistic liberties afforded by an alternate reality event like this.  A writer can deal out massive amounts of carnage to major characters and it won’t really affect future storylines all that much.  The other interesting thing that I’m noticing about this series, is that it’s one of the very few stories where we have a character who is familiar with the way life was before Battleworld, which creates an interesting dynamic when Ian is interacting with characters who have no clue.

Roland Boschi’s artwork isn’t great here.  Some of the panels seem to be lacking detail, which can make it a little difficult to tell exactly what’s going on sometimes.  None of it is completely terrible, but I certainly feel like it could have been significantly better.  However, one of the positive aspects of his style is that it is dark and gritty, which compliments a story like this one well.

Overall, I’m liking the story of this series, and I am curious to see where it goes.  I would have hoped for a slightly better artist, but it’s not something that takes away too much from the overall quality of the book.

The Verdict for Hail Hydra #2:
4/5 – I can dig it.

If you like this review, or any of my others, don’t forget to subscribe!

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

Upcoming reviews:
Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #5 (Secret Wars Tie-In)
Civil War #4 (Secret Wars Tie-In)
Planet Hulk #5 (Secret Wars Tie-In)
The Wicked + The Divine, Volume 1: The Faust Act
RunLoveKill, Volume 1

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Recent Captain America scribe Rick Remender gives us his contribution to the Secret Wars event with Hail Hydra #1.  How does it stand up to the rest of the event’s tie-ins?  Let’s see.

Hail Hydra is the continuation of Remender’s two year run on Captain America, which saw Steve Rogers replaced as Cap by his long time friend, Sam Wilson, aka Falcon.  That series also introduced Steve’s son Ian, that he adopted from villain Arnim Zola during a 12 year period where he was trapped in dimension Z.  This series focuses on Ian as the character of Nomad in a domain of Battleworld where Hydra is and always has been in control.  Ian does his best to fight for freedom in this heavily oppressed society, but in the end he runs into an opponent that he never could have imagined.

Rick Remender’s writing in this debut issue is solid, as Ian’s mentality and thought process is pretty similar to that of his adopted father’s.  He believes in freedom.  He might question that in conjunction with his origins, but Cap instilled a sense of justice and morality in Ian that always leads him down the right path.  Remender always seemed comfortable writing Captain
America’s character and that comfort seems to continue into his writing of Ian.  He’s good at writing stalwarts is what I’m saying.  Aside from great characterization, he also presents an interesting story here in an alternate universe imagining of New York City where the “bad guys” have always been in charge.

Roland Boschi’s artwork is decent enough here.  Some of the action sequences can be a little confusing as far as character positioning goes, but for the most part it’s pretty good.  The character designs and expressions are nothing spectacular, but they’re not bad either.  One of the more positive aspects of the artwork is the fluidity of motion that’s portrayed in the panels.  Ian certainly gives the impression of being able to move gracefully and stay light on his feet, and that is expressed well through the art.

Overall, this issue definitely seems like it could be the start of a pretty interesting series.  I would have liked a little bit more out of the artwork at times, but a solid story and good characterization keep this one on the positive side of my review spectrum.

The Verdict for Hail Hydra #1:
4/5 – I can dig it.

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

Upcoming reviews:
March of the Crabs, Volume 1: The Crabby Condition
Planet Hulk #3 (Secret Wars Tie-In)
Secret Wars: Battleworld #3
Where Monsters Dwell #3 (Secret Wars Tie-In)