Posts Tagged ‘X-Men’

image

The ninth installment of the X-Men cinematic franchise (Origins: Wolverine counts… as much as I would prefer it didn’t) has landed with today’s X-Men: Apocalypse. Set ten years after the events of Days of Future Past, Professor Xavier has built himself a bustling school for mutant children, Mystique is helping mistreated mutants find asylum in an underground society, and Magneto is trying to stay under the radar in the Polish countryside. However, all of their plans go awry when an ancient, god-like power resurfaces after several thousand years.

This movie is VERY full. Full of everything; characters, plot threads, fight scenes. At times it does seem a little overwhelming, but it never got to the point of utter confusion from being overstuffed. There is only one element that I feel could definitely have been cut out, as its only real purpose is to set up for the next chapter in the franchise. Other than that, the story threads were many, but cohesive, and mostly necessary. My biggest complaint is Apocalypse himself, not so much his look, which I didn’t mind, but his character. He never really comes across as that larger than life figure he is in the comics, and I feel like that’s probably what hurts this movie most. Also, for a character so heavily featured in the trailers, Psylocke gets surprisingly little screen time.

The acting is mostly good, although I can’t help but feel that Jennifer Lawrence phoned it in as Mystique in a few scenes. She just seemed kind of bored for most of the movie. McAvoy and Fassbender are still great as Professor X and Magneto, and are worthy successors (or would it be precursors?) to the roles that Patrick Stewart and Ian McKellen defined nearly two decades ago. Many of the new young actors also do a really great job portraying their respective characters.

Overall, I was pleasantly surprised by this movie. I went in with pretty low expectations and came out of the theater feeling satisfied. It certainly doesn’t match the quality and experience of First Class or Days of Future Past, but it doesn’t fail miserably either as some final acts of trilogies have done before, I’m looking your way Last Stand.

The Verdict for X-Men: Apocalypse:
3 out of 5

If you like this review, or any of my others, don’t forget to subscribe!

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

Advertisements

image

Dennis Hopeless and Mark Bagley take another version of the world’s most famous mutant’s in All-New X-Men #1.  This is the same original group of X-Men that Hank McCoy pulled from the past in the recent volume of All-New X-Men, minus the young Jean Grey, who is flying under the radar and possibly working with the Extraordinary X-Men.  In this series, the X-Men are trying to find the young Scott Summers, who has been quietly tracking a group of mutant criminals on his own.

Hopeless writes a solid story here, not breaking it up too much between multiple different characters in different locations.  He keeps the narrative nice and tight to prevent confusion, while building some character depth in the process.  Some additions to the roster, like the new Wolverine, haven’t really been fleshed out and explained all that well just yet, but it’s still early.  Hopeless also makes the character of Scott Summers more interesting and sympathetic than he has been in quite a while.  It’s a refreshing change of pace for a character who had become exceedingly darker over the years.

Bagley’s artwork is good, not great, but good.  I’ve essentially been a fan of his since the early days of his work on Ultimate Spider-Man, so I’ve grown accustomed to his style over the years.  However, I will say what I’ve said before when it comes to his art, I feel like he’d better served with a smaller cast of characters, as all the faces start to look the same after a while.  That being said, he does an admirable job on this first issue, and I hope the rest continue to look this good.

Overall this book is solid, and I definitely like it a lot more than Extraordinary X-Men.  In the end, I’ll probably end up sticking with this one, while I’ve already contemplated dropping Extraordinary.  There’s a little bit more backstory required for All-New X-Men, but if you take the few minutes to acquaint yourself with it, I think it will end up being the better X-book.

The Verdict for All-New X-Men #1:
5 out of 5

If you like this review, or any of my others, don’t forget to subscribe!

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

image

We’re used to a world that hates and fears mutants, but in Extraordinary X-Men #1 that fear and hatred gets taken to a whole new level.  Following the spread of the Inhumans Terrigen Mist, mutantkind is on the decline.  The Mist has some pretty severe effects on mutants, often causing serious harm and rendering all of them sterile.  There is no question, the mutants currently in existence will be the last generation.  These extraordinary times require an extraordinary team to fight the evils of the world, and this group of X-Men, led by Storm, is stepping up to the plate.

Jeff Lemire handles the writing task on this series, and he does a pretty good job of keeping things interesting.  We feel the tension and the vitriol that the mutants face from humans.  Lemire uses this first issue as more of an introduction piece to show Storm gathering as many mutants as she can in order to bring them to a safe location.  In the process of doing that, she is simultaneously recruiting proven fighters like Colossus and Nightcrawler to help defend the compound and keep it safe.  This makes for a lot of jumping around in the narrative, but for the most part, there is enough material with each scene to keep the story from getting too scattered.

Humberto Ramos gets the art chores here.  I’ll be honest, I’ve never been a huge fan of Ramos’ style.  I find it to be too over the top and cartoonish, but in this series it seems to work pretty well.  I’m not sure if he dialed it back a little bit for this book, but I don’t completely hate it.  At the same time, this was more of a slow-paced, story-building issue, so it’s entirely possible that once we get to some more action scenes I may be reminded why I didn’t care too much for his art in the first place.

Overall, this book isn’t really amazing, and there’s nothing particularly special about it, but it is interesting, and I do want to see where they go with it.  Particularly after the last scene in this debut issue.  The first issue kind of plodded along and spread itself around a lot, but now that it seems like all the pieces might be in place, I’d be really curios to see where the creative team decides to steer this team in the chaotic world that they’ve established for them.  Definitely worth a read if you’re an X-Men fan.  If not, you might want to hold out for one of the more mainstream X-books to relaunch.

The Verdict for Extraordinary X-Men #1:
4 out of 5

If you like this review, or any of my others, don’t forget to subscribe!

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

image

The tie-ins are ending faster than I can keep up with them!  Last week the final chapter of X-Men ’92 dropped… with a bang.  The massive X-Sentinel has come to accomplish its mission of assassinating Baron Kelley, but the X-Men might just have something to say about that.  Chris Sims and Chad Bowers keep this action-packed nostalgia trip rolling with a good, old-fashioned X-Men vs. Sentinel fight.  This series has been really fun to read throughout and the final issue is no exception.  It’s a little silly in some spots, particularly in the relationship between Gambit and Rogue, but that just makes it all the more fun.  Scott Koblish’s artwork plays perfectly into the story as well, with the characters looking just slightly cartoonish, but it’s never over the top.  This just might have been the most fun series to come out of Secret Wars.

The Verdict for X-Men ’92 #4:
4 out of 5

If you like this review, or any of my others, don’t forget to subscribe!

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

Upcoming reviews:
Captain America: White #2
Hail Hydra #3 (Secret Wars Tie-In)
RunLoveKill, Volume 1
Crimson Peak (Movie)