Posts Tagged ‘X-Men’

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Marvel pulls out all the nostalgic stops as the X-Force shows up to help out their fellow X-Team.  The more extreme team arrives to take on Cassandra Nova and her mind bending attacks.  In this issue we finally get a better impression of Nova’s sinister plan for the domain of Westchester, and Battleworld at large.  Chris Sims and Chad Bowers continue to tell a really interesting story in this series that seems to be as much a commentary on censorship in comics as it is a fun and nostalgic run down memory lane.  Scott Koblish’s art is still great and fits perfectly with the setting of the story being told.  This has been one of the more fun series in the event.  With just one issue left in this mini-series, I’m curious to see how it ends.

The Verdict for X-Men ’92 #3:
4/5 – I can dig it.

If you like this review, or any of my others, don’t forget to subscribe!

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

Upcoming reviews:
Hail Hydra #2 (Secret Wars Tie-In)
Thors #3 (Secret Wars Tie-In)
The Wicked + The Divine, Volume 1: The Faust Act

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Alright, so one of the more nostalgic Secret Wars tie-ins is back for issue #2.  Here we find the team under the control of the Shadow Queen in what she refers to as The Mind Field.  She drags the members of the team through their worst fears, in the hopes that they will ultimately bend to her will to make the domain of Westchester a more family friendly place in the often violent and chaotic landscape of Battleworld.

Chris Sims and Chad Bowers split the writing again in this issue and they both do quite well.  The opening segment with Wolverine fighting all his major foes, who suddenly change into something far more sinister is done very well and is at times even emotional.  It’s far better than the Wolverine story from Battleworld #3.  Storm’s tale here is tense, if just slightly forgettable, but the real shining moment of the issue is the interaction between Rogue and Gambit.  The romantic tension is there only briefly, but it brings back all the warm fuzzies from their glory days.  Also, I think I’m starting to understand what’s going on with the strange edits and proofreading notations in this series.  Even if it’s not what I think it is, it certainly adds an interesting and curious dimension to the story.

Scott Koblish handles the art here.  It’s not quite perfect, but it is very good.  There are some seriously mind bending segments in this issue that are done really well.  I would have liked some of the character models to be a little closer to the original versions, but that’s really the only complaint that I have, and really, it’s a pretty small one.

Overall, this has been a really fun series so far.  It’s definitely not the best of the tie-ins, but it’s still very enjoyable to read, and it has a solid creative team.  If you’re an X-Men fan, you should be reading this one.

The Verdict for X-Men ’92 #2:
4/5 – I can dig it.

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

Upcoming reviews:
March of the Crabs, Volume 1: The Crabby Condition
Squarriors #3
Ultimate End #4 (Secret Wars Tie-In)
Civil War #2 (Secret Wars Tie-In)
Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #3 (Secret Wars Tie-In)

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It’s the early ’90s again, and one of the most popular iterations of the X-Men is back!  But does that mean it’s good?  Only one way to know for sure…

In X-Men ’92 #1, we find iconic lineup from the early 1990s of Cyclops, Jean Grey, Wolverine, Storm, Jubilee, Rogue, and Gambit, about to partake in a little bit of training.  However, since the Danger Room is currently being repaired, they have to go to the next best place, a Laser Tag facility.  All of the mutant activity causes a nearby group of “free-range” sentinels to show up to try and destroy our heroes.  The team fights off the threat, just as the territory’s Doom appointed baron, Robert Kelly shows up to apologize for the attack, claiming that some of the free-range sentinels had not yet gone through reprogramming which would keep them from attacking mutants.  Kelly also mentions a facility called Clear Mountain, where some of the more dangerous mutants have been taken in an effort to rehabilitate them into productive members of society.  The X-Men are immediately suspicious of this facility and are given the opportunity to visit, but when they arrive, they are quite surprised at what they find.

Writing duties in this oversized issue are shared by Chris Sims and Chad Bowers, and they are able to create an atmosphere that seems to have come straight out of the 1990s X-books (and animated series).  There’s the real, but not quite venomous tension between Wolverine and Cyclops, which hadn’t developed into full blown hatred at this point.  The heavy flirting between Gambit and Rouge is also here, and Jubilee is, well, Jubilee.  If you grew up reading/watching this version of the team, then you will be reliving your glory days.  There are some rather interesting things going on with the dialogue a little later in the issue, after the team arrives at the Clear Mountain facility that I didn’t quite understand (if you read the issue, you’ll see what I’m talking about), so I hope those get explained later in the series, otherwise it would just be really weird.

Scott Koblish handles the artwork here, and like the writers, he does a great job of both making the story look like something from the early ’90s as well as making it his own.  The team looks fantastic, and the backgrounds look a lot like something you would see in a comic from more than twenty years ago.  Team books can sometimes be difficult because of the sheer amount of characters, but Koblish proves in this issue that it’s nothing he can’t handle.

I’ll admit, this is one of the new series that I was really waiting for, and overall, it didn’t blow me away, but I was certainly satisfied with the way it turned out.  On the surface, this might seem like more fan service than anything else, but it’s actually been done really well.  I hope that they creators can keep the quality, and the fun of this series going.  If you’re a fan of the X-Men animated series, or the comic series from the 1990s, this one is definitely for you.

The Verdict for X-Men ’92 #1:
4/5 – I can dig it.

Until next time,
Stay nerdy, my friends.

Upcoming reviews:
Planet Hulk #2 (Secret Wars Tie-In)
East of West, Volume 4: Who Wants War TPB
March of the Crabs, Volume 1: The Crabby Condition

Ultimate Comics: X-Men #1 by Nick Spencer and Paco Medina is the last of the new Ultimate Comics series to debut, and it seems like this time Marvel saved the best for last.

So far in this new Ultimate universe we’ve seen the popular and well known superheroes that everyone roots for (The Ultimates, Hawkeye), we’ve seen the new kid (Miles Morales/Spider-Man), and now we’re being shown the outcasts of the universe, the X-Men and the rest of the mutant world. Yes, you could say that the X-Men and mutants have always been outcasts, dating back to their first appearance in the regular Marvel U almost fifty years ago, but they’ve never been treated like this before. Due to the events of the Ultimatum storyline from 2009, it is now perfectly legal to shoot and kill any mutant, regardless of whether they’ve done anything wrong. On top of that, it’s just been revealed to the general public that mutants are not a product of natural selection as it was originally thought, but rather, they were created by the U.S. Government during the 1950s, which causes widespread rioting throughout many of the nation’s biggest cities. This issue opens with a very powerful scene featuring Karen Grant (formerly known as Jean Grey) that shows how incredibly hateful the world has turned against mutants by this point, then moves to a press conference with (Presidential Aide? I’m not really sure of her title, sorry.) Valerie Cooper, who was introduced during the Ultimate Fallout series, where she is answering some questions regarding the revelation of the manufactured mutants. After this we see some reactions from various characters, including the group that Karen Grant pulled together in the Ultimate X mini-series, about what she said. In the end there are a certain few who decide that they can no longer hide, and feel the need to take action.

Nick Spencer does a nice job of setting everything up in this issue. We really get a sense of the hatred and fear that people feel toward mutants in this world and how dark and foreboding the future looks for them. Effectively, they’ve all been reduced to the status of terrorists because of the actions of one. One minor complaint about the issue, is that it doesn’t feel like a true first issue of a book, but given the circumstances, that was probably unavoidable. There is a lot of backstory that happened before this issue that makes this world the way it is. Where all of the other Ultimate books feel like something new entirely and you can pick them up and read them without having read anything else in the Ultimate Marvel Universe, this book is more a continuation of that past universe. This is the holdover for the fans who have been there for the entire run and know the history of the universe (Ha, that sounds kind of funny).

Medina’s art reflects the general mood that Nick Spencer is trying to produce with the story. Everything is very depressed and almost washed out. There are no bright and flashy colors here. Facial expressions are done well, with much attention to detail paid to the emotions they’re trying to exhibit. You feel the sadness that is there during the first scene, and the outrage of the people in the press conference. You feel the confusion and hurt of the mutants as they’re hearing the news that in reality, they’re nothing special after all.

Overall, I’d say if you could only read one Ultimate Comics book, this is shaping up to be the one to read. However, before you do that, there are a few things you need to know about this universe first if you’re a newcomer. You can find all the information you need to know in three other mini-series that I highly recommend reading before this comic: 1. Ultimatum – As bad as it was, there are some significant plot points there that you’ll need to know, and it just generally sets up this new Ultimate Comics universe; 2. Ultimate X – It will give you the back stories on all of the characters that Karen Grant pulled together, because it seems like they’re going to play a big role in this series; and finally 3. Ultimate Fallout – This will give you the immediate history of what’s going on in this issue. Check those three out, then check this issue out. You won’t regret it.